1

Reading through some answers seam to be factually wrong. I am not sure if it is a standpoint in another school hence there is a dilemma on how to deal with them. People who as the question and would be readers may end up confused or misguided.

3

Unless there is an obvious factual mistake (e.g. someone says s\he quotes Majjhima Nikaya while obviously quoting Milinda Panha) I would not rush with comments. We don't want to discourage new users by long flamewars in the comments. Certainly, if you asked for clarification once and the author responded, but you are still not satisfied, I would strongly recommend to restrain your horses. Instead, post your own answer with whatever facts you consider valid. If you absolutely must argue, please kindly proceed to chat, and there discuss your point to your heart's content.

Also, remember the following:

...
-- 'As for Kashyapa... You see, Asvajit' -- sighed Gotama, 'some people believe that the purpose of philosophical debate is to outargue the opponent and prove one's superior understanding.'
-- 'But this is so, Master Gotama, the one who wins the dispute, he must be the wiser, right?'
-- 'One who is really wise, Asvajit, debates not to win.'
-- 'What point is to argue then?!'-- As far as common sense Kaundinya had no equal.
-- 'It is quite pointful still. The point is, for the two sides, through combining two different understandings of the same problem, to free themselves from mistaken fixations, each side from their own.'
...

  • Any argument in comments or chat does not take you any where. The problem remains unsolved as the person reading will not get the best / right information. We need to have something to achieve this. – Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena Sep 2 '14 at 13:29
  • I will gladly consider your constructive ideas on the topic :) – Andrei Volkov Sep 4 '14 at 2:18
  • 1
    One possibility is to request a reference/citation. It's one thing to post one's personal opinion (that's allowed on this site, is it?). But it's another thing to misquote (misrepresent) someone else. A possibility would be to post a comment, "Are you sure: where does it (the literature of your school) say that? What does it say exactly? Could you please provide a reference and a quote?" At the very least, such a comment would be a signal to any future reader that that point is unreferenced and surprising, perhaps debatable or contentious. – ChrisW Sep 6 '14 at 9:01
2

I would put a comment in asking for clarification. Maybe it is a different school that has that interpretation. If no satisfactory answer came back then I would downvote. I personally would always leave a comment about why you have downvoted but that is just me.

Of course if it is abusive or inflammatory in any way then I would flag for moderator attention.

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